Always Be Dancing Expressive Arts

Yoga and Flamenco for Every/body


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¡Olé Namaste!

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Pictured above from top left: Two students strike a pose, Hurley School, Boston; Eve Costarelli (AKA Eva Lorca); Students learning palmas at St. Stephens after-school program, Boston, MA; Visual representations of flamenco; Antonio Tiriti and Eve performing at the Natick Farmer’s Market; Students performing the story of Ferdinand The Bull; Eve teaching how braseo to students of St. Stephen’s after-school program, Boston, MA; Eve and some students. (Thank you to Celebrity Series and Robert Torres for the pictures of Eve and St. Stephen’s)

I am a flamenco dancer. Through this dance, I communicate my kinship to the gypsies, a group of wanderers/nomads/pilgrims who migrated from Northern India during the 8th and 9th centuries. One route that they took was through Saudi Arabia and Northern Africa, before arriving in Spain through the Straits of Gibraltar. These gypsies were comprised of expert metal workers, animal tenders and entertainers. They arrived in Spain when the country was controlled by the Moors (made up of Arabs, Syrians and Berbers). In Spain, the gypsies mixed freely amongst the veritable melting pot of cultures. In Andalucía, a region in Southern Spain known as the birth place of flamenco, the gypsies found a land that suited them and found a sense of connection with the people who lived there: the Jews, the Moors and the Spaniards. The gypsies absorbed the diverse cultures around them: the music of the Moors, the songs of the Sephardic Jews and the dances of the Spaniards and then coupled with their heritage from India, they transformed the music, song and dance into the art of flamenco.

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My journey to become a flamenco dancer has been a deeply personal artistic pursuit. I have found that the greatest joy of flamenco is discovering my interpretation and style within the art form. As a flamenco dancer, I possess the capacity for self-controlled passion and emotional expression which becomes the underlying energy which motivates me to dance. This is my life force, my soul, my chi, my prana. Duende, the passion and inspiration within, is the heart of the flamenco artist. It is the transfer of emotions across space. It is the energetic imprint of the raw emotion released as a result of a performer’s intense emotional involvement with the music, song and dance. It is in the sum the energy the dancer takes from the earth, drawing it up through the soles of their feet. It travels through the body electrifying the the base, the core, the heart and shines forth through the crown of her head.

It is in this sensation filled space that I find the connection between flamenco and yoga. I speculate that the gypsies created the movements in flamenco directly in correlation to the yoga body. The energy centers, the chakras, directly speaking to the emotional output of the artist. I believe that the gypsies brought with them an underlying understanding of yoga and that this physical, emotional and spiritual connection to the body was then naturally incorporated into flamenco’s expression. It is fascinating to teach flamenco under the label of mindfulness. I incorporate it (plus a smattering of other rhythmic and contemplative movement forms) into all of my youth yoga classes. I find that flamenco is a perfect addition as its many benefits go hand-in-hand with the benefits of yoga.

Flamenco and Yoga both:

  • Stimulate memory, thinking and retention
  • Increase the ability to focus, listen, observe and absorb
  • Reduce Stress
  • Strengthen the heart muscle, both physically and emotionally
  • Increase positive energy
  • Develop balance, flexibility and coordination
  • Strengthen confidence, patience and risk taking skills
  • Build community
  • Deepen sense of self
  • Expand world view
  • Heighten happiness
  • Help you get in touch with your emotions and give you a safe outlet for their release
  • Cultivate accessibility, adaptability and inclusivity

When you want to plant a flower, you first need to till the soil, nourish it, plant the seeds, water it, and then sit back and wait to see the blossom….now in relation to the flamenco body. If you imagine that the soil line is at the hips, so your legs and your feet are the roots below the surface. The roots grow down and ground the dance to the earth. From the waist up is the blossom, growing from the soil line (which is your hips). This is the blossom. With good, strong roots, you then use the upper body to create the shapes and lines true to flamenco, building out of the hips and allowing the legs and feet to move separately.”

My favorite part about teaching is sharing my love of movement and making both the arts of flamenco and yoga accessible. Yoga is not one tangible thing. It is not movement; it is not breath; it is not meditation. What it is, is all of these things. Each of these elements leaves an energetic imprint, a vibrational frequency on the person, and that is the yoga. I love both yoga and flamenco in my life and I live to share them. With each personal exploration of my own energy’s movement, I teach. Yoga and flamenco are deeply connected to my soul, and I am constantly evolving. I choreograph the dance between effort and surrender. I find such joy in these sensations. All I want to do is to share them with my students.

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WORLD MUSIC/CRASHarts PRESENTS FLAMENCO FESTIVAL 2016

Adobe Photoshop PDF

WORLD MUSIC/CRASHarts PRESENTS

Direct from Spain

FLAMENCO FESTIVAL 2016

Featuring Spain’s foremost dancers and musicians

March 5 & 6, 19 & 20, 2016

Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston

VICENTE AMIGO vicente_sm1

Saturday, March 5, 8pm – $60, $50, $40, $32

http://worldmusic.org/content/event_page/3646/vicente-amigo

Latin Grammy–winning Vicente Amigo is known as one of today’s most dazzling flamenco guitarists and a likely successor to Paco de Lucía. Hailing from Córdoba, Spain, Amigo is at the forefront of a new generation of flamenco performers, steeped in the classic style while constantly innovating within the tradition.

 

FARRUQUITO Farruquito 2 by Sophie Mühlenburg

Performing the Boston premiere of Improvisao

BOSTON PREMIERE WORK

Sunday, March 6, 7:30pm – $79, $65, $52, $40

http://worldmusic.org/content/event_page/3656/farruquito

From the legendary Farruco dynasty, the first family of Gypsy flamenco dance, Farruquito is regarded as one of the most faithful representatives of flamenco puro. His new show, Improvisao, is a work of intimate, authentic, and visceral flamenco, which Farruquito calls “a return to my roots.” He will be accompanied by guest dancer Gema Moneo, four singers, two guitarists, and a percussionist.

 

ROCÍO MOLINA Bienal

Performing the Boston premiere of Danzaora & Vinática

BOSTON PREMIERE WORK

Saturday, March 19, 8pm – $79, $65, $52, $40

http://worldmusic.org/content/event_page/3666

Rocío Molina is at the forefront of modern flamenco and has been awarded many of Spain’s top accolades, including National Dancer of the Year. Considered “one of the finest soloists in the world today” (The New York Times), she performs the Boston premiere of Danzaora & Vinática, a thrilling work with live musical accompaniment.

 

ROSARIO “LA TREMENDITA” & MOHAMMAD MOTAMEDI 

Qasida   Flamenco meets Persian classical murosariomo_sm2sic

BOSTON DEBUT/ BOSTON PREMIERE WORK

Sunday, March 20, 7:30pm – $48, $42, $37, $30

http://worldmusic.org/content/event_page/3676

The Qasida project is an extraordinary musical encounter between the young Spanish singer Rosario “La Tremendita” and her Iranian peer Mohammad Motamedi. Renowned for accompanying flamenco dancers Belén Maya, Rocío Molina, Rafaela Carrasco, and many others, “La Tremendita” explores the roots of flamenco in the richly varied poetic songs and improvisations of Motamedi, the young rising star of Persian classical music. They will be accompanied by six musicians on guitar, Iranian kemanche (a bowed string instrument), percussion, and palmas (hand clapping).

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DanceNut a great website for Boston area dance professionals!

Greetings, Boston area dance professionals and business owners!

I am pleased to announce the launch of the all-new Dance Nut web site.  Our goal is to help build a stronger Boston area dance community by helping dancers more easily find the local teachers, studios, classes and events that are right for them.

In other words, we want to help dance students find YOU.


Please come take a look.  Register now and post your profile, classes and events for FREE! 

Please contact me with any questions or suggestions about how the site can better serve you as we grow.

Kind regards,

Andrew Percey
Founder, Dance Nut LLC